Last edited by Magal
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

6 edition of Jephthah and his vow found in the catalog.

Jephthah and his vow

by David Marcus

  • 26 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Texas Tech Press in Lubbock, Tex., U.S.A .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Jephthah (Biblical judge),
  • Bible. O.T. Judges XI -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDavid Marcus.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBS1305.2 .M37 1986
    The Physical Object
    Pagination77 p. ;
    Number of Pages77
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2553744M
    ISBN 100896721361, 0896721353
    LC Control Number85051356

    Article from Biblical Perspectives Vol Number Search Tips. Attach an asterisk (*) to the end of a word as a wildcard. Attach a tilde (~) to the front of a word to omit results containing that word. Jephthah, his family, his successes, and his vow to God. It is difficult to understand how a loving God would allow a man to kill his only daughter. After studying the scripture passage, however, we see that Jephthah may have fulfilled his vow in a way that was acceptable to the Lord. The account of.

    Judges 11 Amplified Bible (AMP) Jephthah the Ninth Judge. 11 Now Jephthah the Gileadite was a brave warrior, but he was the son of a prostitute. Gilead was the father of Jephthah. 2 Gilead’s wife bore him sons, and when his wife’s sons grew up, they drove Jephthah out and said to him, “You shall not have an inheritance in our father’s house, because you are the son of another woman. The Rabbis severely criticize Jephthah’s vow and conduct that resulted in the senseless death of his daughter. Jephthah is portrayed as a haughty individual, who flaunts his position as commander of all the military chieftains, when in actuality he was an ignoramus, unlettered in the Torah she-bi-khetav: Lit. "the written Torah."The Bible; the Pentateuch; Tanakh (the Pentateuch, Prophets and.

    Jephthah Character Analysis “ [Jephthah] did with her according to his vow that he had made” (Judges b1). The tragedy and confusion of the account of Jephthah lie in the fact that Jephthah, not only fulfilled his unfaithful vow, but the fulfillment of that unfaithful vow resulted in the killing of an innocent life, his daughter. So Jephthah, in his madness, put himself in a position where, in order to fulfill his vow, he would have to violate Deuteronomy and commit the sacrilege of child sacrifice. GAH!


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Jephthah and his vow by David Marcus Download PDF EPUB FB2

Jephthah and His Vow Hardcover – Janu by David Marcus (Author) › Visit Amazon's David Marcus Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author.

Learn about Author Central Cited by: One of the more troubling passages of the Old Testament has to do with a vow made by one of Israel’s judges, Jephthah, as recorded in Judges Jephthah vowed to God that if the Lord would grant him victory over the evil Ammonites, the first thing that came out to meet him upon his return home, would be Jehovah’s, and/or it would be.

Jephthah carried out the vow when she returned. The tribe of Ephraim complained to Jephthah that he had not asked them to help him against the Ammonites, and they threatened to burn down his house. Jephthah replied that he had summoned them, but they had not reacted.

Jephthah gathered an army of Gileadites and defeated the Ephraimites. Jephthah’s vow concerning his only daughter seems to be another example of the barbarity described in this book (Judg. But is it. What exactly did Jephthah vow, and what did he do to his daughter.

There are two proposed interpretations: Jephthah offered up his daughter as a whole burnt offering. Moreover, if Jephthah merely dedicated his daughter to the Lord’s service, the Law reveals that she would not need to become a lifelong virgin at the tabernacle.7 Leviticus and 4 state, “When a man consecrates by a vow certain persons to the Lord, according to your valuation if it is a female, then your valuation shall be thirty Author: Tim Chaffey.

I must confess that I have struggled a great deal with this text. I am more than willing to point out the weaknesses and failures of other men in the Book of Judges, but find it very difficult to think the worst of Jephthah because I like him, except for what I read about his vow and his daughter.

In his defense, Jephthah might point out that it was actually his daughter who insisted that he fulfill his vow to God (Judges ) perhaps mitigating to some extent his responsibility. Her death might even be regarded as an act of martyrdom, not unlike Samson’s willingness to die for the sake of his God and his people.

Webb says that the vow was a bribe, that Jephthah was shrewd, and that he was self-centered. Did Jephthah sacrifice his daughter.

A Bloodless Sacrifice. There is a second interpretation that asserts that Jephthah never committed human sacrifice, but rather he dedicated his daughter over to the Lord as mentioned in Leviticus ff.

When Jephthah returned, he saw his only child—his daughter—coming out to celebrate the victory (v. 34). This led to great mourning, for Jephthah thought himself bound to the vow, and he kept it (vv. 35–40).

But what did Jephthah actually do to his daughter. Jephthah Was an Ignorant Servant. Jephthah’s grief was real, to be sure but he also had to have known that his vow meant a member of his family would die.

That it was his precious daughter instead of some supposed “lesser” household member (such as a. The decision to keep the vow had been very hard for Jephthah since his daughter was his only child.

Jephthah told her daughter: “And it came to pass, when he saw her, that he tore his clothes, and said, “Alas, my daughter. You have brought me very low.

You are among those who trouble me. For I have given my word to the Lord, and I cannot go. Second, an omniscient God would have already known that Jephthah daughter would be the first to come out his door. Yet God approved Jephthah’s vow, regardless.

Grief-Stricken Jephthah. Jephthah went on to destroy 20 Ammonite towns and defeat an Ammonite army that the Book of Judges says “God delivered into Jephthah’s hands.” (Judges   Before going into battle, Jephthah made a vow to God that if the Lord gave him victory over the Ammonites, Jephthah would make a burnt offering of the first thing he saw coming out of his house after the war.

In those times, the Jews often kept animals stabled in a ground-floor enclosure, while the family lived on the second floor.

In the 12th Chapter of Judges, Jephthah made a vow to God to present as a “burnt offering” the first thing that comes out of his house to greet him, if God will let him defeat the Ammonites.

As anyone whose read the story knows, his daughter rushes out to greet him, and gamely submits to the terms of her father’s vow. Jephthah and His Vow Paperback – Janu by David Marcus (Author) › Visit Amazon's David Marcus Page.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Central. David Marcus (Author) 5/5(1).

Jephthah's Vow (Judges 11) October 1 We come now to one of the most difficult passages in the book of Judges—the story of Jephthah. The story is more important than one would at first suspect, for the critics have seized upon it as evidence that God is self-contradictory, bloodthirsty and devoid of any sense of equity and justice.

Jephthah’s battle against the Ammonites was not won because of his vow, but because of God’s presence (). His lack of faith in God, and understanding of who God is, cost him his daughter.

The biblical traditions recall that as a great tragedy (). Verses We have here Jephthah triumphing in a glorious victory, but, as an alloy to his joy, troubled and distressed by an unadvised vow.I.

Jephthah’s victory was clear, and shines very brightly, both to his honour and to the honour of God, his in pleading and God’s in owning a righteous cause.

Jephthah’s letter to the Ammonites (–27) furthermore indicates his knowledge of the military history in Numbers 20–21, and the opening clause of his vow is identical to the vow reported in Numbersother than the name of the opposition.

Jephthah’s tragic vow cost him the life of his precious daughter all because he sought to manipulate God for his own benefit. Just before verse 29 in chapter 11 of Judges the editors of my Bible have included a subtitle “Jephthah’s Tragic Vow”.

First, the book says that the Spirit of the Lord came upon Jephthah [Judges ], and in that Spirit of the Lord he made this vow unto the Lord. And in the twelfth chapter of the Book of Deuteronomy and in the last verses of that chapter, you have a severe and an awful interdiction against human sacrifice.The "vow" Jephthah made (Jdg ) was a "nadar" -- for which the Law allowed the possibility of redemption upon payment of money.

(Lev ,8). Considering this, it is almost unthinkable that the distraught father would not have availed himself of this "escape" if the vow had meant death for his. Jephthah agrees to postpone the fulfillment of the vow.

His daughter and her friends mourn that she will never experience the joy of a wedding or the rewards of raising children; for a young Hebrew woman, a devastating reality, to her and to her family. Verse 39 concludes with two points. It says of Jephthah that “he did with her according to.